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Richard Ziolkowski, UA professor of electrical and computer engineering, is no stranger to traveling the world as a representative for the College of Engineering. And starting in January 2015, he will once again represent the College as he flies across the globe to begin work in Australia as a Fulbright Distinguished Chair.

Ziolkowski will serve a five-month term as the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Advanced Science and Technology working with the country’s Defence Science and Technology Organisation to help connect government work and educational research. Based in Melbourne, he will work on DSTO priority research projects as well as give guest lectures and attend seminars at universities throughout Australia.

A key benefit of the program is the opportunity to explore longer-term collaboration and create new links with institutions in Australia. Thus, his time in Australia, Ziolkowski said, will align well with the College of Engineering’s global initiatives and help strengthen already developing international ties there.

“Not only will I be focusing on bringing my expertise to DSTO and universities in Australia, but I’ll... Read Complete Article



Jonathan SprinkleJonathan Sprinkle, assistant professor in the electrical and computer engineering department and inventor of the cost-controlling thermostat, recently received the first-ever UA Catapult Award in Engineering.

Sprinkle was one of four faculty members who received a 2014 Catapult Award from Tech Launch Arizona, a UA organization that helps move inventions and intellectual property from the lab to the marketplace. The awards honored faculty who are bridging the gap between research and consumer needs.

With support from TLA, Sprinkle has filed invention disclosures on his closed-loop cost-controlling thermostat and created a startup company, Acomni LLC, to support the technology. The thermostat enables homeowners to decide temperatures based on their budgets.

Sprinkle also was recognized last year with a Career Award from the National Science Foundation for his research in cyberphysical systems.



Alum Patrick Marcus, president of Marcus Engineering LLC, has received the 2014 Tech Launch Arizona Catapult Award for Ecosystem Impact.

The award, which Marcus received during a March 24 ceremony, recognized his work as a “community connector” bringing people together through a variety of efforts, including teaching children engineering, participating at the Arizona Center for Innovation and creating public art installations. 

Marcus, who earned his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1999 and his doctorate in biomedical engineering in 2006, serves on advisory boards for the College of Engineering and the Arizona Center for Innovation, and the board of the UA Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance. He founded Marcus Engineering, a Tucson electronics firm that supports product development for medical devices and instrumentation, in 2011.



ECE alum Robbie Laity was named "rising design star" in Design News Magazine.Design News Magazine has named Robbie Laity, a 2013 electrical engineering graduate, "one of our nation’s rising design stars."

The magazine published its annual list of stars in January. Nominees were chosen based on their ability to stay ahead of the trends, significantly perform in their industry and outperform their peers. 

Patrick Marcus, president of Marcus Engineering, a Tucson electronics firm that supports product development for a variety of industries focusing on medical devices and medical instrumentation, nominated Laity for the award.

Laity interned at Marcus Engineering while he was a student at the University of Arizona and is now an electrical engineer with the company. 

"We are so proud to have Robbie as part of the team. He’s a brilliant and generous engineer," said Marcus, a UA alum who earned his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1999 and his doctorate in biomedical engineering in 2006. "... Read Complete Article



University of Arizona College of Engineering