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By Jill Goetz, College of Engineering

University of Arizona researchers are developing technology that converts smartphones into powerful eye-examining instruments that could prevent millions of people from going blind.

Wolfgang Fink, professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering, is principal investigator of a new project funded by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity program to create “smart ophthalmoscopes,” specialized instruments for examining various parts of the eye’s interior. The devices, which can be attached to any smartphone, and accompanying software will enable health care providers, particularly in remote areas, to quickly and easily determine if patients are at risk of losing their vision. 

“Our hand-held ophthalmoscopes will permit eye exams in places they would otherwise be impossible,” said Fink, the Edward and Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair and director of the UA Visual and Autonomous... Read Complete Article



UA, ASU and NAU students design and test antennas during a workshop at the Antenna Measurement Techniques Association Meeting and Symposium.

UA, ASU and NAU students design and test antennas during a workshop at the Antenna Measurement Techniques Association Meeting and Symposium. Engineering students from all three Arizona public universities don’t often gather at one time.

But that is what happened when 22 students from the University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Arizona State University joined the 2014 Antenna Measurement Techniques Association, or AMTA, Meeting and Symposium, held in October in Tucson. 

The annual conference highlights the latest technology and research in antenna and other electromagnetic measurement technologies. AMTA Student Day, which was started seven years ago, gives college students a chance to interact... Read Complete Article



ECE graduate student Farah Fargo (center) received the Best Research Poster award at the 2014 IEEE International Cloud and Autonomic Computing Conference in London for her research in cloud computing and load-balancing systems.

ECE graduate student Farah Fargo (center) received the Best Research Poster award at the 2014 IEEE International Cloud and Autonomic Computing Conference in London for her research in cloud computing and load-balancing systems. As more and more organizations realize the benefits of cloud computing -- reduced hardware costs, increased bandwidth, and anywhere, anytime access to data, for example -- engineers are tasked with developing technology to more effectively manage resources in the cloud.

One hurdle in cloud computing involves balancing power consumption and performance. As such, UA electrical and computer engineering graduate student Farah Fargo, in... Read Complete Article



ECE professor Linda Powers spoke to dozens of Engineering 102 freshmen and high school students during an October presentation about the vital role engineers play in cases of epidemic or pandemic outbreak.

As Ebola continues to pose national and international risks, engineers are being called on to design devices and processes that protect against the virus.  Linda Powers, electrical and computer engineering professor, is among the University of Arizona researchers contributing to preventative methods while also training the next generation of engineers to be prepared for global biomedical issues.

Powers spoke to dozens of Engineering 102 freshmen and high school students during an October presentation about the vital role engineers play in cases of epidemic or pandemic outbreak. ECE professor and Engineering 102 instructor Kathleen Melde said Powers, who is developing methods to advance the detection of... Read Complete Article



University of Arizona College of Engineering